Most Misunderstood Trait of Auditory Learners

Most Misunderstood Trait AuditoryAuditory learners really do need to have their iPods on. Their questions and comments are not off-topic, they just need to get those ideas out of their minds, so they can move on. Their fingers frequently work faster when their mouths are running.

For further help on this topic, and to see the rest of the posts in the “Auditory Learning Week” series, see this link:

“Auditory Learning” topic

#TakeMeBackTuesday: Auditory Learners

#TakeMeBackTuesday AuditoryAs part of Auditory Learning Week, we invite you to read the Auditory Learners excerpt from our book, Taking the Mystery Out of Learning Styles. This excerpt focuses on auditory learning and explores some of the techniques that are useful in teaching students who are motivated by any opportunity to talk, comment, discuss, and ask questions. Enjoy!

For further help on this topic, and to see the rest of the posts in the “Auditory Learning Week” series, see this link:

“Auditory Learning” topic

Top 10 Ways to Help Auditory Learners

Top 10 Ways to Help Auditory LearnerThese tips will be helpful for parents of younger auditory students, who need help learning how to learn.

  1. Read instructions aloud together. He’s not being lazy and obstinate; he really needs to hear it.
  2. Do question and answer sessions orally, and use oral discussions to determine if students understand lesson concepts, plot twists, character traits, etc.
  3. Allow the student to hum, drum, beat-box, and make other noises, because stifling those sounds also stifles his brain. This can also include loud and rhythmic typing on a computer keyboard.
  4. Put this child in a room by himself or allow other students to leave the room for the sake of peace, harmony, and clear thinking.
  5. Allow the student to read and review notes aloud. Let him hear it and say it.
  6. Use oral explanations of difficult concepts, lesson directions, etc. This can go beyond basic lesson instructions to allowing the child to talk it through to the point of understanding.
  7. Stop taking away his iPod. Allow the student to use background music as “white noise” (headphones at low volume work well to avoid disturbing others). Ask if there are other distracting sounds that could be turned off to help him concentrate.
  8. Allow him to answer for himself, especially when relatives or friends ask how school is going.
  9. Give him time to think all the deep thoughts going on in his head. Allowing his “off-topic” comments and questions enables him to “erase the blackboard of his mind,” providing a clean slate for the next lesson.
  10. Give him experiences in the other 3 styles to improve his overall learning abilities.

For further help, visit these links:
Learning Styles v. It’s a Syndrome
“Auditory Learning” topic (including all of this “Auditory Learning Week” series)
“Learning Styles” topic

Top 10 Ways an Older Kinesthetic Learner Can Help Himself

Top 10 Ways Older Kinesthetic Learner Help HimselfThese tips will be helpful to active students in middle school, high school, college, or beyond, who need to motivate themselves and control their own learning environment. Some lessons are inherently kinesthetic; if the lesson has a kinesthetic component, do that first (don’t sit on an exercise ball while watching a video about running, when you can just go run). If you are struggling to find a kinesthetic application, try some of the following suggestions.

  1. Run, bike, rollerblade, etc. before attempting lessons, so your brain will be running full-throttle and ready to handle information. Take a break during lessons or studying and get some physical exercise to wake up your brain. Repeat as often (and as hard) as necessary.
  2. Stand, walk, pace, etc. to help you think through a tough problem. The exercise will keep your brain functioning fully and will provide another memory key.
  3. Do push-ups over your book, dumbbell curls, toss and catch a baseball, shoot a basket, etc. for every point or fact you review. The exercise will keep your brain functioning fully and will provide another memory key.
  4. Vary your body position and/or “seating” arrangement while reviewing material for a test. Lie back on pillows on your bed, lie on your stomach on the floor, sit cross-legged in the grass, climb up to the treehouse, etc. Use a swivel barstool or rocking chair or balance on an exercise ball or skateboard. The movements will keep your brain functioning fully and will provide another memory key.
  5. Make *BIG* flashcards (“TV-game-show” size) that require arm movements to hold and shuffle, not just hands; they can also use print large enough to be seen from a distance while using a stationary bike, treadmill, etc. Use heavy-weight cardstock, poster board, cereal-box cardboard, etc.
  6. Floorcloths! Use permanent markers to turn a discarded bed sheet or tablecloth into a very large, reusable diagram for graphing rectangular coordinates, plotting graphs, periodic table, skeletal anatomy, etc. Poker-chips or Post-It notes work well for marking points or labeling the diagram. Fold it up and store it away between uses!
  7. Use a white shower curtain liner and wet-erase markers as a large, reusable, floorcloth-style whiteboard. In some situations, this could also be attached to a large wall for a vertical writing surface.
  8. Consider alternative methods to written papers: video presentations, dramatic re-enactments, personal performances, etc.
  9. Stand at an easel with easel pad or paper roll to draw out graphs, diagrams, etc. for review or to re-write notes. The larger size and vertical orientation are both beneficial kinesthetic learning methods.
  10. Incorporate learning methods from the other 3 styles to improve your overall learning abilities.

For further help, visit these links:
Learning Styles v. It’s a Syndrome
“Kinesthetic Learning” topic (including all of this “Kinesthetic Learning Week” series)
“Learning Styles” topic

#ThrowbackThursday: Kinesthetic Learners

#ThrowbackThursday Gem from Kinesthetic ArchivesAs part of Kinesthetic Learning Week, we invite you to take a look back into the Guilt-Free Homeschooling archives. The gem we have selected as a supplement to this week’s focus is Beanbags (No-Sew DIY) for its unique approach to taking lessons out of the chair and off the worksheet. Whether your students need an opportunity to jump, stretch, and play, or just want an exciting, new twist on old, tired lessons, these ideas will help you easily adapt worksheet or flashcard methods into dynamic and energy-expending fun that will be remembered much longer than printed, fill-in-the-blank questions. Enjoy!

For further help on this topic, and to see the rest of the posts in the “Kinesthetic Learning Week” series, see this link:

“Kinesthetic Learning” topic

Most Misunderstood Trait of Kinesthetic Learners

Most Misunderstood Trait KinestheticKinesthetic learners really do need to move and wiggle in order to keep their minds awake and alert. A play-break before studying is much more beneficial than the promise of a break afterwards.

For further help on this topic, and to see the rest of the posts in the “Kinesthetic Learning Week” series, see this link:

“Kinesthetic Learning” topic

#TakeMeBackTuesday: Kinesthetic Learners

#TakeMeBackTuesday KinestheticAs part of Kinesthetic Learning Week, we invite you to read the Kinesthetic Learners excerpt from our book, Taking the Mystery Out of Learning Styles. This excerpt focuses on kinesthetic learning and explores some of the techniques that are useful in teaching students who are motivated by any opportunity to get out of their seats and into the action. Enjoy!

For further help on this topic, and to see the rest of the posts in the “Kinesthetic Learning Week” series, see this link:

“Kinesthetic Learning” topic